Sustainable Coffee


Café Mam is sustainably grown, fair trade, organic, shade grown and hand picked.

Two words. Café Mam.

There it is folks, the best coffee I’ve ever had the pleasure to brew. Not only that, but it’s the most sustainable and at a price that beats most lesser quality brands. Less than $10 bucks a pound for a 5 lb. bag and that includes tax and shipping!

Why care about the coffee you drink?

Simple. By purchasing coffee that is sourced from growers using sustainable agricultural methods, you are part of the solution and not the problem. Café Mam coffee is grown by fair trade cooperatives of native Mayan farmers living in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico and Guatemala. According to their website –

“The farmers believe that by taking care of the soil, they are taking care of the entire bio-system. Their beliefs and sustainable approaches to agriculture benefit their communities in many positive ways. Café Mam farmers seek to conserve and rebuild the natural environment and work toward a higher quality of life for their families.”

The growers that supply the beans belong to a collective. The collective is organized according to egalitarian democratic ideals that emphasize hard work, responsibility, and high standards. The cooperative’s programs provide countless benefits to outlying native communities.

Over the past 30 years coffee grown from sun tolerant trees has been the norm. However, the mono-cropping methods used depletes soil and has a negative impact on the environment. Conversely, shade grown varieties support biodiversity and house up to two-thirds of the bird species found in natural forests in the same geographic areas.

You can feel good about the coffee you drink, knowing it provides so many benefits to the environment. I like to keep Café Mam coffee on hand so I don’t run out. Going online to order is easy, convenient and makes a wonderful gift for that sustainable someone in your life.

Let It Bee: Raising Honey Bees for Fun and Profit


   Raising Honey Bees For Fun And Profit

Beekeeping can be a fun hobby or even a thriving small business for those with little or no knowledge of bees. The startup costs are low – the average hive is approximately $300 and you only need one to get started.

Once you have purchased a hive it can be kept in a remote corner of your back yard. Nowadays we commonly see suburban homes with a bee hives compared to just 10 years ago. Some like to have a consistent source of local honey for themselves and for trade. Others see a potential revenue stream that is local, sustainable and fun to do.

“Egyptians called honey a “gift from the gods”.

Your local Cooperative Extension office will tell you if the area you live has any beekeeping restrictions. You will also get contact numbers of your states beekeeping organization where you can register as a beekeeper.

Bee Keeping Basics

Choosing the location for your hive is an important step. This may be on your property in a unused portion of your garden or with a local farmer or land owner. Note: Always ask permission before setting up your bee hive. See Your Home’s Most Underused Resource – The Roof.

Once you have selected a site for your beehive you will need to go about acquiring the equipment needed to successfully maintain a beehive. Some of the equipment you will need can be purchased used on EBay. If you are unable to find the equipment you need on EBay there are several on-line sites where you can purchase equipment. If you need further assistance finding and purchasing a beehive and other beekeeping equipment call your local Cooperative Extension office or the Federation of American Beekeepers.

Before acquiring bees for your hive it’s important to make sure about your protection – this means you have to purchase beekeepers gear.

Bee Keeping Gear

So once your bee hive is already in place and you are confident that everything is in working order it’s time to order your honey bees. An established Apiary is one of the places to order honey bees. Your order should be placed in winter, the average beekeeper orders their bees in January and February. March and April is the usual time of shipment Most Apiary’s ship their bees through the U.S. postal service. Once the bees have arrived you will be called by your carrier and ask that you pick up the bees. Many mail carriers are not comfortable driving all over the county with a car full of young angry bees in their car and most bees are healthier if they don’t have to spend several hours in a hot car.

When you pick up your bees they should have been packaged in a special carrying case that is designed just for bees. This package will be a wooden framed “house” that has a screen covering the outside. This packaging allows air to circulate to the traveling bees and keeps handlers, such as post office employees, from getting stung.

When you get your bees, you’ll probably find a few dead bees laying in the bottom of the package. This is a normal part of shipping and is no reason for concern.

You will notice that one bee in the container has been separated from the rest of the hive. This is your queen bee. The rest of the bees in the container will make up the rest of your bee hives hierarchy. Some apiaries ship the queen with a couple of nurse bees. The top of the queen’s container will be covered with piece of sugar candy.

You should also see a container that is filled with a sugar solution. The bees feed on the sugar solution while they are traveling. You should then offer your bees a drink. You do this by taking a spray bottle and covering the container with a very fine misting of water.

Honey is a food source for bees where they store the excess in anticipation of days when outside food sources are scarce. This excess honey can be collected by the beekeeper for personal or business use.

Keep in mind that when outside nectar sources are scarce, bees will require more honey to survive, limiting the amount beekeepers are able to harvest. If beekeepers are interested in collecting consistently bigger quantities of honey they will need to do one of two things. Either increase the size of and number of colonies or provide a bee food supplement during seasonal changes or difficult periods in the local climate or ecology.

Liquid and Comb Honey

There are two types of honey that for-profit beekeepers can sell; liquid honey and comb honey.

The liquid form is extracted from the hive by utilizing a centrifuge with little physical effort. Selling pieces of the comb is also a profitable means of earning income from beekeeping. Many individuals prefer this kind of honey’s natural flavor in spite of its less convenient form.

Honey comes in a variety of colors and flavors. The flavor of honey is significantly influenced by the nectar bees collect. Other factors such as the soil composition, varieties of floral plans, and the general weather conditions in your geographical region will all influence the flavor of the honey produced by the hive.

The color of the honey is also affected by the plants honey bees obtain nectar from. For instance, alfalfa nectar produces honey ranging from clear to white, while honey resulting from the bee’s harvesting nectar from buckwheat tends to be significantly darker. Honey can be found in clear, white, gold, brown, red and even greenish hues. The quality of the honey combs constructed by bees can also affect both the color and flavor of the honey.

If you would like to distinguish your honey, you can influence the flavor, color and sugar content by planting specific varieties of flowers and plants nearby. To see a complete list of various honey types, go to www.honeyo.com/.

If beekeepers are processing and packaging honey for profit, it is important to research, learn and follow all state and federal regulations associated with food. Beekeeping for profit is a business like any other and local governmental guidelines can vary so you will need to do your homework and ensure that you are meeting all of the appropriate general business and food specific laws and regulations.

Beekeeping is an activity that anyone can undertake as it requires minimal land. Men, women, elderly and youth can participate!

Benefits to Bee Keeping

  • It takes minimal time and effort in a season, therefore allowing for normal work-a-day activities to carry on. It has relatively low technology requirements!
  • It is a low investment activity which requires only bee hives, bee suits and a few simple tools. Beekeeping basics are easy to master!
  • Bees pollinate the indigenous flora, adding value to wild harvested fruits, nuts and economic trees and plants as well as 1/3rd to any food production through targeted pollination!
  • Beekeeping projects can be linked with many other production projects to bolster participant numbers and income generation!
  • Beekeeping provides employment and self-esteem, there is opportunity for quick return on investment, and minimal land requirements!
  • Honey is a valuable non-wood forest product thus contributing to the preservation of forests around the world!
  • Honey is a commodity that can be traded internationally as well as locally or regionally without special consideration as to storage or loss!
  • Honey is a high value product with a stable and lucrative supply versus demand economy. Honey is very portable as well!
  • Honey and its by-products have many healthy benefits for the consumer and are lucrative trade commodities in value addition form!
  • Most honeybee products can be consumed as food, dietary supplements or used as medicine. And bee products have a long shelf life and are a valuable food source!


See this short video on the Principals of Beekeeping : Beekeeping Equipment to get started today.

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