Caramelized Onion and Gouda Bread


Two of my favorite flavors combine to make this bread so delicious, it’s dangerous. Warning: Do not bake this bread around gluten-free friends!

The savory aroma of onions and cheese will waft from your kitchen with this delicious recipe. Don’t count on having leftovers. You’ll see why when it hits the table and disappears in front of your eyes!

INGREDIENTS:

Caramelized onion and gouda cheese bread.

3/4 Cup Milk or Substitute Almond or Rice
1/2 Cup Filtered Water
1 Egg
4 TBS Softened Butter or Olive Oil
1-1/2 tsp Sea Salt
2 1/2 Cups All-Purpose White Flour
1 1/2 Cups Whole Wheat Flour
3 TBS Raw Cane Sugar
1 Large Onion
2 Cups Grated Gouda Cheese
3 tsp Quick-Rise Yeast

Prepare by chopping the onion and sauteing with 2 tbs olive oil over medium high heat for one minute or until translucent. Then reduce heat to low and caramelize. This will take 15 – 20 minutes. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine 1-1/2 cups flour, sugar and yeast. In a small saucepan, heat the milk, water and cubed butter to 120-130 degrees. Add to dry ingredients; beat just until moistened. Add egg; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough.

Turn onto a floured surface; knead until a uniform ball of dough is formed. Then add 1/3 of caramelized onions to dough and knead to incorporate (about 1 minute). Repeat until all of the onion is kneaded into dough and add one cup of grated cheese – about 5-6 minutes total.  Cover and let rest for 10 minutes.

If making loaves, divide dough in half. Shape each into a long rope. Place ropes on baking sheet (I like to spread sesame seeds between the sheet and the bread to keep it from sticking). Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 25 minutes.
Bake at 375 for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pan to a wire rack to cool. Immediately sprinkle remaining cheese on loaves and watch it melt.

A Call To Farms – Why America Needs A New Victory Garden Movement


WWII-era U.S. War Garden poster

Victory gardens, also called war gardens or food gardens for defense, accounted for the production of nearly 40 percent of the nation’s produce at its peak in 1943.  Vegetable, fruit and herb gardens were planted at private residences and public parks in United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Germany during World War I and World War II to reduce the pressure on the public food supply and build morale. The U.S. government considered this effort a matter of national security. So, what has changed in the past 50 plus years?

Today, home and community gardeners grow only a fraction of what our parents and grandparents grew during the War. Meanwhile, agribusiness has grown out of control. Monsanto, who holds patents on about 80% of all genetically modified seeds, sues small farmers when their fields are contaminated with the patented seed. (see Rodney Nelson’s family farm) Monsanto spent almost $9 million lobbying Washington lawmakers during 2009, an off-election year for national politics.

The U.S. government gives millions of dollars every year, in the form of farm subsidies, to multinational conglomerates who grow monoculture crops like corn. Most of this corn is not even edible and is used solely to make high fructose corn syrup and fillers for highly processed, low ANDI scoring foods. These government subsidies make foods with high sugar content very cheap, according Marion Nestle, a nutrition professor at New York University and author of Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health, referring to the most prevalent sweetener: high fructose corn syrup, which sweetens most soda pop while upping the calories. (Read a PBS interview with Nestle.)

The politics of food has become a global phenomenon, with nations like China purchasing hundreds of thousands of acres of Brazilian farmland to feed its growing population. Food prices have soared around the world in recent years pushing many impoverished peoples to the brink of starvation. While most of us in the U.S. have been spared this type of shock, nearly all of us have felt the squeeze on our food budgets. If this trend is to be reversed, a different system of food production is needed.

What we need is a brand new Victory Garden Movement.

National Security Is Food Security

Victory gardens were planted in backyards and on apartment-building rooftops, all in support of the war effort to protect our national security. Vacant lots were actually “commandeered for the war effort” and were utilized to grow whatever was needed. During World War II, sections of lawn were publicly plowed for plots in Hyde Park, London to publicize the movement. In New York City, the lawns around vacant “Riverside” were devoted to victory gardens, as were portions of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park.

Today however, we are facing a new threat – not only to our national security, but to our food security. In 1870, 70-80 percent of the US population was employed in agriculture. As of 2008, that number has dwindled to approximately 2-3 percent of the population.

The cultural heritage of growing of food has been systematically hijacked from the American people over the past 60 years. In response to this shift, the urban farming movement in the U.S. and around the world has taken off. This movement is the result of many factors, food security being only one of them.

A distributed system is a resilient system. DARPA (the project that ultimately resulted in the creation of the Internet) was originally created in response to the Soviet launching of Sputnik during 1957, with the mission of keeping U.S. military technology ahead of the Soviets. The World Wide Web therefore was designed not from a small number of large supercomputers, which would be vulnerable to attack, but a distributed model with thousands of servers located all over the United States.

Urban farms, community and backyard vegetable gardens, represent this same systems model. By having tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of small urban farms located in communities all over the U.S., we can be resilient and practice sustainable agriculture on a small scale. Price spikes will be cushioned by those who, not only grow their own food, but share, barter, trade and sell to one another.

Corrine Asturias' front yard vegetable garden produces an overabundance and shares the surplus with her neighbors.

Community

The intrinsic nature of farming in an urban or suburban setting creates opportunities for community interaction. When one family replaces their front lawn with a series of raised beds, it has a ripple effect. People peer over their neighbors’ fences and are intrigued. Some even get inspired and start their own vegetable gardens or mini urban farms.

These interactions are only the beginning of the benefits to the community. For example, the Marin Open Garden Project encourages backyard gardeners to bring the excess from your garden to exchange with other gardeners every Saturday in San Anselmo.

Jobs

Urban farming offers the promise of safe jobs that are local and sustainable to the millions of unemployed. Many of them are struggling to pay their mortgages and feel trapped to look for work within commute distance. Putting people back to work in urban farming jobs could be a boon to our economy and put millions of Americans back to work – work that is necessary, healthy and safe.

Unlike conventional large-scale farming, organic urban farming is small scale (even micro-scale), uses no heavy equipment, toxic pesticides or herbicides. Conventional agriculture is among the most hazardous of industries. Farmers are at high risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries, work-related lung diseases, noise-induced hearing loss, skin diseases, and certain cancers associated with chemical use. Farming is one of the few industries in which the families are also at risk for injuries, illness, and death.

Sustainability

Growing food close to where it will be prepared and consumed exemplifies the path to sustainability. The savings in fuel from not having to transport food from long distances is a compelling reason alone. Add to that, the energy needed to refrigerate and store perishables, and we’re talking significant reductions in carbon emissions.

Nutrition

Produce begins to loose nutritional value immediately after harvest. When food is grown close to home, the time between harvest and consumption is often reduced to mere hours rather than days or weeks. This maximizes the nutritional benefit.

There is also an unquantifiable value to growing your own vegetables or knowing the people who do. You feel connected to your community in a real way and often wind up eating a more healthy diet, while wasting less of this precious resource.

“I probably spend as much time working in my garden each day as I spend making coffee only it is a lot more interesting”, said Corrine Asturias about her front yard vegetable garden that used to be a dry, eye-sore of a front lawn.

Physical Activity

The modern lifestyle is one of convenience and reduced physical effort.

Our forefathers were far more physical than the average American is today. Thomas Jefferson, for one, worked long hours on his own personal farm at Monticello and considered himself to be “a man of the land”. He was an avid farmer and is considered to be one of America’s early agronomists.

Vegetable gardening and urban farming is a wonderful way for people of all ages and abilities to get daily exercise, sunshine and fresh air. Modern growing techniques allow us to grow far more produce in a smaller space and with much less effort than before.

People of all ages and backgrounds can benefit from just a short time spent in the garden. “I probably spend as much time working in my garden each day as I spend making coffee only it is a lot more interesting”, said Corrine Asturias about her front yard vegetable garden that used to be a dry, eye-sore of a front lawn.

Flint River Farm in Flint, Michigan, the city’s largest urban farm.

Conclusion

The Dowling Community Garden in Minneapolis, Minnesota is the last vestige of the original Victory Gardens from World War II.

Fortunately, there is a sea change on the horizon. Places like Flint, Michigan and Detroit are experiencing a Renaissance in the urban farming movement.  Michelle Obama’s digging up the front lawn of the White House to plant a Victory Garden of her own is reminiscent of Eleanor Roosevelt’s own Victory Garden as first lady.

Our nation is ready for a new approach to growing our own food. History is again our great teacher, as we rediscover the ways our ancestors worked the land, sustainably and for the betterment of society.

Sustainable Coffee


Café Mam is sustainably grown, fair trade, organic, shade grown and hand picked.

Two words. Café Mam.

There it is folks, the best coffee I’ve ever had the pleasure to brew. Not only that, but it’s the most sustainable and at a price that beats most lesser quality brands. Less than $10 bucks a pound for a 5 lb. bag and that includes tax and shipping!

Why care about the coffee you drink?

Simple. By purchasing coffee that is sourced from growers using sustainable agricultural methods, you are part of the solution and not the problem. Café Mam coffee is grown by fair trade cooperatives of native Mayan farmers living in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico and Guatemala. According to their website –

“The farmers believe that by taking care of the soil, they are taking care of the entire bio-system. Their beliefs and sustainable approaches to agriculture benefit their communities in many positive ways. Café Mam farmers seek to conserve and rebuild the natural environment and work toward a higher quality of life for their families.”

The growers that supply the beans belong to a collective. The collective is organized according to egalitarian democratic ideals that emphasize hard work, responsibility, and high standards. The cooperative’s programs provide countless benefits to outlying native communities.

Over the past 30 years coffee grown from sun tolerant trees has been the norm. However, the mono-cropping methods used depletes soil and has a negative impact on the environment. Conversely, shade grown varieties support biodiversity and house up to two-thirds of the bird species found in natural forests in the same geographic areas.

You can feel good about the coffee you drink, knowing it provides so many benefits to the environment. I like to keep Café Mam coffee on hand so I don’t run out. Going online to order is easy, convenient and makes a wonderful gift for that sustainable someone in your life.

Superfoods At A Glance


Here is a brief list of the most talked about superfoods available today.

Açai bowl with granola and bananas

Açai (ah-sah-ee)
Açai is known as the “King of Superfoods” because it is low in calories, but high in omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Açai contains substantial amounts of omega-3 fatty acids and is high in fiber, vitamins and minerals.

You can enjoy açai like they do in Rio de Janeiro by having the frozen pulp of the fruit served with sliced bananas and granola, as it is shown here. This makes  a wonderful desert, quite like like a sorbet. You can also find this superfruit in powder or pill form.

Camu Camu Berry

Camu Camu is best known for its Vitamin C content (30 to 60 times more naturally occurring Vitamin C than oranges) plus many of the minerals needed to aid in vitamin C absorption.

The camu camu berry is also an excellent source of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, iron, the amino acids serine, valine and leucine, as well as small amounts of the vitamins B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin) and B3 (niacin). Camu camu also contains high levels of anthocyanins (a powerful antioxidant).

Camu Camu berries

Camu Camu has a long history as a key folk medicine by people living in the Amazon. Recently,  Camu Camu has been marketed as a nutritional supplement claiming to provide antioxidant and anti-inflammatory support for infertility, herpes, gum disease, infections, connective tissue and even depression. However, there is very little science supporting the nutritional claims. The berry is exported around the world with Japan being a major consumer.

Despite Camu Camu’s impressive vitamin C content, the fruit is extremely acidic, and the flavor can be masked by adding small amounts to smoothies diluting with milk, water and adding a sugar substitute like honey or agave nectar.

Camu Camu is 4-5 times more expensive as compared to other sources of comparable fruit pulps and even concentrates containing high levels of vitamin C.

The camu camu tree can live several decades and be cultivated to produce as much as a ton of fruit per acre. However, the over-harvesting of wild Camu Camu threatens to make it an endangered species. Efforts are underway to encourage the commercially sustainable growing of Camu Camu in the Amazon River Basin.

Dulse (Ocean Vegetable)

Dulse, edible algae

Dried Dulse - an edible ocean vegetable

Dulse (Palmaria palmata) is a red algae seaweed or sea vegetable with fan-shaped fronds that grows from the moderate to frigid zones of the North Atlantic and Pacific. It has been harvested as a source of food for thousands of years, and continues to be popular in Northern Ireland, Iceland, and parts of Canada.

Dulse is a good source of iron, manganese and iodine. It also contains all trace minerals (or micronutrients) needed by humans, and a comparatively large amount of protein. It also has a high fiber content.

Dulse makes a great addition to salads, soups,tomato and fruit juices, and as a nutritious salt substitute.

Hemp Seed

Organic Hemp Seeds

Hulled Hemp seeds contain all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids necessary to maintain healthy human life. The seeds can be eaten raw, ground into a meal, made into hemp milk (akin to soy milk), prepared as tea, and used in baking. Products range from cereals to frozen waffles, hemp tofu to nut butters.

About 30-35% of the weight of hempseed is hemp oil, an edible oil that contains about 80% essential fatty acids (EFAs). Hempseed also contains about 20% of a highly-digestible protein. Its amino acid profile is close to “complete” when compared to more common sources of proteins such as meat, milk, eggs and soy.

Hempseed is an adequate source of calcium and iron. Whole, toasted hempseeds are also a good source of phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, copper and manganese.

I like to use hempseed in my bread recipes to add protein and a rich nutty taste. Best of all, hempseed contains no gluten, so it’s great for those who are gluten intolerant.

Chia Seeds

Organic Chia Seeds

The mighty chia seed is a powerhouse food, high in protein, fiber and the essential omega-3 fatty acid ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), as well as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, copper, iron, molybdenum, niacin, and zinc.

Chia is an edible seed that comes from the desert plant Salvia hispanica, a member of the mint family. It has a long history, cultivated by the Aztecs and Mayans in pre-Columbian times. It was a staple to their diets, and the diets of their warriors.

Enjoy chia seeds sprinkled over your favorite muesli, in smoothies, on yogurt, in energy bars, or healthy salad. If you soak the chia in water for 30 minutes, they absorb 10-12 times their weight, and turn to a gel because of their high level of soluble fiber. Unlike flax seeds, they can be enjoyed as is, since they don’t need to be finely ground to be utilized by the body.

Chia is 16% protein, 31 % fat, and 44% carbohydrate of which 38% is fiber. Most of its fat is the essential omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid or ALA, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20 (2007).

Maca
Maca is the powdered root of the Lepidium Meyenii plant. Known for its ability to support healthy energy levels, maca has been used by the Incas as a kind of “Incan superfood” for thousands of years and was a central part of the Incan diet when they built Macchu Picchu.

This powerful superfood is packed with 18 amino acids, minerals such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium and sodium and minute amounts of trace minerals essential for healthy cell functioning (copper, zinc, manganese, iron, selenium, boron). Maca also contains vitamins B1, B2, B6, C, D3 and P.

You can spoon the powder into smoothies or over cereal. A little goes a long way. 1/4 to 1 teaspoon per day is an average daily amount.

Pomegranate

Pomegranate
Pomegranates are a source of polyphenols, which help the body rid itself of cancer-causing agents; tannins, which lower blood pressure and stimulate the immune system; and anthocyanins, which reduce inflammation and protect blood vessels.

The fruit is rich in vitamins A, C and E, and in iron, which helps the blood maintain an effective supply of oxygen to the body. It is a good source of iron for pregnant women.

Goji Berries

The berries actually have a unique component called Lycium barbarum polysaccharides. This substance actually has a similar structure  to substances found in Echinacea and maitake mushroom, both are known herbs for their immune system  boosting ability. According to research, the compounds found in Goji berries enhance our body’s ability to resist a disease.

Goji Berry Plant

Moreover, each berry is a rich source of vitamin C and zinc, both are powerful protection from diseases and assist our body for recovery. A previous study from Case Western Reserve University has results that show the ability of zinc to shorten the length and severity of cold.

Spirulina

Spirulina is a single-celled, spiral-shaped blue green microalgae grown in tropical salt lakes. Being one of the oldest organisms on the planet, spirulina is anywhere from 62-71% essential amino acids. It also contains beta carotene (ten times more concentrated than that of carrots), along with other carotenoids.

It also contains chlorophyll, GLA (Gamma Linolenic Acid), and vitamin B12.  B12 is important for healthy tissues, energy, and nerves, especially for strict vegetarians.

As a super concentrated source of chlorophyll, spirulina also cleans the blood while alkalizing the body. Containing a full spectrum of bio available minerals, spirulina is rich in Magnesium and Iron, two minerals lacking in the average diet and responsible for many imbalances. Spirulina ranks second to mother’s milk in concentration of natural gamma linolenic acid (GLA).

The phytonutrient in spirulina that gives it the striking blue green color is phycocyanin. In animal studies, it is showing great promise in the stimulation of the production of stem cells in bone marrow. These stem cells will mature into red blood cells and white blood cells.

Largest spirulina farm in the world.

Spirulina has promise at being a high protein food source that can be grown sustainably to provide valuable nutrient rich food to the under-served populations of the world.

Oils are not typically thought of as a superfood but, because our brains are nearly two thirds fat. We need fat for healthy functioning brains as well as cells, connective tissues and a whole host of bio-chemical processes. Here’s a quick rundown on the good and not so good sources of oils.

Olive Oil
Organic olive oil is a monounsaturated fat, and is considered a good fatty acid (high density lipoproteins, HDLs) protect against bad cholesterol, or low density lipoproteins (LDLs).

Delicious organic olive oil contains all the vitamins and nutrients of the olive fruit, and if you get a premium organic olive oil, it will taste better and have a full aroma.

Organic olive oil is also filled with antioxidants, vitamins and nutrients that may protect you against illnesses. Studies have shown that organic olive oil can help:
  • Protect You from Heart Disease [1]
  • Promote Healthy Digestion [2]
  • Ease the Symptoms of Ulcers & Gastritis [3] [4]
  • Lower Gallstone Formation [5]
  • Balance the Fatty Acids in Your Body

Coconut Oil
Coconut oil has gotten a bad rap when decades old health studies characterized the oil as hydrogenated. Some foods did contain the hydrogenated form of the oil and the media proclaimed coconut an “unhealthy fat”. Actually, it contains absolutely no trans fats in its pure form, but contains medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). The food industry instead promoted polyunsaturated fats (such as canola, soybean, safflower and corn), which easily go rancid when exposed to oxygen and produce harmful free radicals in our bodies.

In Polynesian culture, coconut oil has been used as a traditional food since ancient times, and they have among the lowest rates of heart disease in the world.

Coconut Oil Benefits:

  • Promotes weight loss and helps maintain healthy body weight
  • Reduces the risk of heart disease
  • Supports thyroid function
  • Increases metabolism and energy
  • Prevents bacterial, viral, and fungal infections
  • Helps control diabetes and chronic fatigue
  • Improves digestive disorders such as Crohn’s disease and IBS
  • Protects against alcohol damage to the liver
  • Rejuvenates skin and prevents wrinkles

Make sure to buy organic, unrefined, unbleached  and undeodorized coconut oil. Even if the label reads “cold-pressed”, it has still  been fermented or heated to remove water, and in the process will lose the natural vitamin E and tocopherols needed for stability and protection against rancidity.

And be sure to stay away from Canola oil – this is toxic!

The New Era of Food Politics


Food for Life distributes food on an internati...

Food for Life distributes food on an international level.

Most of us have heard a great deal about food lately.

Michael Pollan‘s book Omnivore’s Dilemma caused the agribusiness conglomerates to refer to the millions of his fans as having been, “Pollan-ated”. Food Inc. grossed over $4 million worldwide and was nominated for an Oscar, making it one of the highest viewed documentaries of all time. And recently Michelle Obama just announced the USDA’s program to educate us about proper nutrition by replacing the decades old Food Pyramid.

Multiple factors are fueling this focus on food and nutrition;

  1. Health Care today is eroding American‘s ability to pay for their own health insurance
  2. Food security is breaking down with numerous outbreaks of federal recalls of meat and produce
  3. Increased information about antioxidants and the importance of eating fruits and vegetables
  4. Food prices have soared worldwide, powering a surge in urban farming
  5. The aging Babby-Boomers are demanding better nutrition through food and food supplements

Millions of Americans are now more concerned than ever about what goes in their bodies. Many different definitions have been used to describe people’s choices of what they eat. Vegetarian refers to those who do not eat meat or anything with eyes. Lacto-ovo vegetarians add milk products and eggs to their diets.

Mycena Interrupta is one of many organisms that belong to detritivores.

Unfamiliar to most are the lesser known terms such as “vegcurious”, referring to those that do not identify themselves as vegan or vegetarian but are curious about reducing the amount of meat and dairy in their diet. “Flexitarians”are people who occasionally eat meat, fish and dairy, but stick to a mostly vegetarian lifestyle.

There are also “pescetarians”, who eat fish and seafood to supplement their vegetarian diet. Then there are the “freegans,” who eat only free food, particularly food about to be tossed in the dumpster. This group is out to make a political statement while acting as the human equivalent of the detritivore.

Whatever group you fall into, there is one overwhelming conclusion – we are becoming aware not only of the personal benefits to a more healthy diet, but of the impact our decisions about food have on our planet. We are approaching a time of awakening for human kind (akin to the Age of Enlightenment) where we take a fresh look at the effects of all food related systems that affect our health and our environment.

World Population Chart

This new perspective will be a critical element to our ability to create sustainable agricultural systems that build economic stability, improve quality of agricultural lands and insure the viability of a world population that is on track to reach 10 billion by the year 2040.

MyPlate Symbolizes A New Health-Conscious Generation


Today June 2, 2011, is a turning point in our government’s attitude toward the “American diet”.

First Lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack unveiled the federal government’s new food icon, MyPlate, replacing the familiar and often confusing Food Pyramid that so many of us were used to growing up.

Most notably, the icon is a plate, which is a universal symbol in most cultures. The highlight is that half of the plate is covered with fruits and vegetables. This is a huge step toward creating a more health conscious population.

The sad truth is that currently, Americans are more obese than ever. According to the CDC’s 2009 statistics, overall obesity in the United States is 26.7%. Obesity was calculated based on self-reported weight and height and defined as body mass index (weight [kg] / height [m]2) ≥30. Some states actually ranked much higher than the average.

Childhood obesity rates are rising rapidly at a time where multiple factors are reducing the time that children spend engaging in physical activity. This is causing a never-before-seen class of children with early onset of childhood diabeties.

These trends all point to our nation’s health epidemic that is in full crisis mode. If you have any question, see http://forksoverknives.com/.

Proper Nutrition Is Only Half The Battle

The lack of daily exercise is one of the biggest factors contributing to America’s weight problems. People who live in Appalachia and the South are the least likely to be physically active in their leisure time. In many counties in that region, more than 29 percent of adults reported getting no physical activity other than at their regular job.

Although the new MyPlate icon doesn’t address the issue of exercise, it is an essential part of the solution to being more healthy. And later this year, the USDA will be launching an online tool that consumers can use to personalize and manage their dietary and physical activity choices. This is at least a start on reeducating the public on the need for creating a healthy lifestyle.

Essentially the USDA Guidelines reinforce these basic rules:

Balance Calories
• Enjoy your food, but eat less
• Avoid over-sized portions

Foods to Increase
• Make half your plate fruits and vegetables
• Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk
• Make at least half your grains whole grains

Foods to Reduce
• Compare sodium (salt) in foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals, and choose foods with lower numbers
• Drink water instead of sugary drinks

If you’re interested to read up on the details on the USDA’s programs, go to:

And if you, or someone you know is concerned about their weight, you can use this body mass index calculator below.
BMI For Adults Widget

Fruits & Vegetables

I am thrilled to know that part of the new health initiative includes a multi-year campaign with the message “Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables.” Getting people to eat them is, well – another story….

The social media aspect to this campaign is very interesting. They are encouraging people to take a photo of their plates and share on Twitter with the hash-tag #MyPlate. I’ll be tweeting my plate tonight from my account: @chrisripps if you’d like to follow.

The USDA is showing great public concern for our nation’s obesity epidemic, although they are not calling it that. However, what is needed is a “lifestyle overhaul”. People have been brainwashed into thinking that ‘fast food’ is cheap and convenient. What they don’t realize is that it’s cheap for a reason. It’s not so much food as it is filler that’s been pumped up to trick the taste buds into thinking it’s food.

Fast Food Is Pure Evil

Why is fast food so cheap? Because our government has been giving BILLIONS of dollars in subsidies to the corn and soybean farmers.

The fiscal 2011 Farm Bill contained crop subsidies as the largest federal agricultural spending item.  This years Farm Bill proposes to take a total of $2.7 billion (13.4%) out of the food and agriculture budget including steep cuts to: Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program (SARE), The Renewable Energy for America Program (REAP) and farm conservation funding programs.

Until our government gets truly serious about our food policies and embraces a total solution, I believe that most of the needed changes will come from grassroots and non-profit organizations working together with local communities.

Please support you local farmers and buy from farmers markets and CSAs whenever you can!

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